Service Areas

Summit Traffic Flagging serves counties, cities, boroughs, and townships throughout Eastern Pennsylvania.

Traffic Control and Flagging Services in Eastern Pennsylvania

Summit Flagging is continuously expanding into new territories. If you don’t see your county, city or town listed, please call 610-777-1061 option 1 and ask us about your specific location. We look forward to serving you!

Flagging Hotline: 610-777-1061 Opt. 1

Adams County

Founded in 1800, Adams County is most famous for hosting the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. The county is renowned for its agricultural heritage, particularly apple orchards and vineyards. Now more than 100,000 residents travel on the county’s 1,200 miles of public road and 250 bridges to enjoy its blend of historical charm and natural beauty. It is home to the following cities and townships:  

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Berks County

Berks County, PA, established in 1752, has a rich history tied to its early German settlers. It played a crucial role in the American Revolution, hosting the Reading Furnace, a key iron producer. Today, more than 2,700 miles of road and 1,000 bridges transport the 420,000 residents living in communities that include:

  • Bern Township
  • Exeter Township
  • Fleetwood
  • Lower Alsace Township
  • Lower Heidelberg Township
  • Heidelberg Township
  • Perry Township
  • Reading
  • Richmond Township
  • Robesonia Township
  • Spring Township
  • Upper Macungie Township
  • Wyomissing

Bucks County

Founded in 1682, Bucks County, PA, hosted a series of important historical events, including Washington’s crossing of the Delaware in 1776 and the Battle of Coryell’s Ferry in 1777. Today, it is treasured for its quaint towns, bustling farmers’ markets, and outdoor recreational opportunities. More than 620,000 people use its 1,600 miles of roads and 600 bridges and live in communities that include the following:

  • Bensalem Township
  • Bristol Township
  • Buckingham Township
  • Doylestown Township
  • Falls Township
  • Hilltown Township
  • Lower Makefield Township
  • Middletown Township
  • Newtown Township
  • Northampton Township
  • Upper Southampton Township
  • Warwick Township

Carbon County

Established in 1843, Carbon County depended on anthracite coal in the 18th century to fund the development of towns like Mauch Chunk (now Jim Thorpe). In modern times, it’s known for its scenic beauty, outdoor recreational opportunities, and more than 600 miles of public roads and 150 bridges. 64,000 residents live in communities that include the following:

  • Beaver Meadows
  • Franklin Township
  • Jim Thorpe
  • Lansford
  • Lehighton
  • Lower Towamensing Township
  • Palmerton
  • Penn Forest Township
  • Summit Hill
  • Towamensing Township
  • Weatherly

Chester County

Chester County, the oldest county in PA, was founded in 1682. It played a pivotal role in the American Revolution, hosting the Battle of Brandywine. Welsh settlers also left their mark. “Tredyffrin” is derived from the Welsh “tref” (settlement) and “Dyfrin” (Valley). “Gwynedd” means “Blessed land” in Welsh. Today, 530,000 residents travel over approximately 2,200 miles of public road and 1,000 bridges in townships and cities that include the following:

  • Caln Township
  • Chester Springs
  • Coatesville
  • Downingtown
  • Exton
  • Kennet Square
  • Oxford
  • Paoli
  • Pottstown
  • Phoenixville
  • Tredyffrin Township
  • Uwchlan Township
  • West Chester
  • West Whiteland Township

Cumberland County

Cumberland County, PA, was established in 1750. It played a significant role in the French and Indian War as a frontier region facing threats from Native American tribes allied with the French. Now 260,000 residents use its 1,400 miles of road and 350 bridges in communities that include the following:

  • Camp Hill
  • Carlisle
  • East Pennsboro Township
  • Hampden Township
  • Lemoyne
  • Lower Allen Township
  • Mechanicsburg
  • North Cumberland
  • North Middletown Township
  • Shippensburg
  • Silver Spring Township
  • South Middleton Township
  • Wormleysburg

Dauphin County

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Dauphin County, PA, established in 1785, became home to the state capital, Harrisburg, in 1812. The county thrived as a transportation hub, with the Pennsylvania Canal and later the railroad contributing to its growth. Today, 280,000 residents use its 1,200 miles of road and 360 bridges in communities that include the following:

Juniata County

Established in 1831, Juniata County has a past rooted in agriculture, industry, and community. In the 19th and early 20th century, the county’s dense forests attracted loggers who harvested timber for construction, fuel, and paper production. Agriculture is now shaping the county’s rural character and close-knit communities, totaling 24,00 residents. The county has 400 miles of roads and 100 bridges. Communities include the following:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Lancaster County

Established in 1729, Lancaster County, PA, was home to the first Pennsylvania capital and served as the nation’s capital on September 27, 1777. It was also a center of the abolitionist movement. Today, Lancaster County is known for its rich farmland, Amish communities, and vibrant cultural scene. It is home to more than 540,000 residents, who use its 3,200 miles of roads and 1,600 bridges (including 29 covered bridges) to access communities that include the following:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Lebanon County

Founded in 1813, Lebanon County, PA, was settled by a combination of Germans, Scots-Irish, and English. It is home to the Cornwall Iron Furnace historical site and Fort Indiantown Gap, established in 1931, famous for being one of the busiest National Guard training sites. Now 141,000 residents use 1,100 miles of public road and 200 bridges to reach communities that include the following:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Lehigh County

Founded in 1812, Lehigh County, PA, was originally a hub for iron ore production. Mining expanded when anthracite coal was discovered in the 19th century. The county is now known for its diverse economy, cultural attractions like the Allentown Art Museum, and beautiful natural landscapes. In modern times, 370,000 residents travel over approximately 1,000 miles of public road and 330 bridges in townships and cities that include the following:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Montgomery County

Montgomery County, PA, founded in 1784, is part of the original William Penn land grant and home to Valley Forge National Historical Park. Initially rural, it transformed into a key industrial area with the growth of the railroad. Today, it’s a vibrant suburban county with more than 1,600 miles of road, 1,300 bridges, and 830,000 residents living in communities that include:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Northampton County

European colonists founded Northampton County in 1752. It played a key role in the Industrial Revolution, with Bethlehem Steel being a major employer. The county is also known for its historic sites, including the Bachmann Publick House and the Moravian settlement of Bethlehem. Today, it has approximately 1,100 miles of public roads and 360 bridges. It is home to over 310,000 citizens living throughout the county, in cities and townships such as;

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Northumberland County

Founded in 1772, Northumberland County, PA, played a key role in the American Revolution. The county’s economy was initially based on agriculture and later expanded to include coal mining and industry. Northumberland County now has about 960 miles of public roads and 200 bridges. It is home to over 89,000 citizens living throughout the county, in cities and townships such as;

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Perry County

Perry County, PA, founded in 1820, has been shaped by its rural landscapes and agricultural heritage. It was named after Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, a hero of the War of 1812. The county’s economy was historically driven by farming, and it played a role in the development of the Pennsylvania Canal. Today, Perry County has about 660 miles of public road and 160 bridges. It is home to over 46,000 citizens living throughout the county, in cities and townships such as;

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Schuylkill County

Schuylkill County, PA, established in 1811, has a rich history rooted in coal mining and industry. Its name, derived from the Dutch word for “hidden creek,” reflects its early settlement by Dutch traders. The country played a significant role in the Industrial Revolution, with coal mining driving its economy for decades. Today, Schuylkill County has approximately 1,300 miles of public roads and 300 bridges. It is home to over 140,000 citizens living throughout the county, in cities and townships such as;

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

Snyder County

Snyder County, PA, was established in 1855 and named after Simon Snyder, the third governor of Pennsylvania. The county’s economy was initially based on agriculture, lumbering, and milling, but it later diversified into manufacturing and services. Today, Snyder County is known for its rural character, Selinsgrove Speedway, and the Middleburg Historic District. Its 40,000 residents enjoy 400 miles of public road and 100 bridges. Communities include the following:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs

York County

York County, PA, has a rich history dating back to the 18th century. It was established in 1749 and played a significant role in the American Revolution, serving as the temporary capital of the United States in 1777. The county’s historical sites, like the Colonial Courthouse, reflect its pivotal role in American history. York County maintains about 2,400 miles of public roads and 800 bridges today. It is home to over 450,000 citizens living throughout the county, including some of these cities and townships:

  • Abbottstown
  • Biglerville
  • Carroll Valley
  • Cumberland Township
  • East Berlin
  • Freedom Township
  • Gettysburg
  • Highland Township
  • Littlestown
  • Mount Joy Township
  • New Oxford
  • Tyrone Township
  • York Springs